Sally C. Pipes

Business & Economics

Male-Female Facts and Fallacies

“History shows that the career paths of women over the course of the twentieth century bore little resemblance to a scenario in which variations in employer discrimination explain variations in women’s career progress.” The author of that statement, Thomas Sowell, Hoover Institution scholar, believes that there is indeed discrimination against …

Commentary

Thailand’s misuse of ‘compulsory licensing’ allowed corrupt officials to steal millions

When it comes to public health, Thailand’s former government leaders would like the world to think that they’re a collection of 21st-century Robin Hoods. Last year, the unelected military-backed government gave Thailand’s state-run pharmaceutical firm, the Government Pharmaceutical Organization (GPO), permission to manufacture generic versions of drugs that fight heart …

California

State should look east for affordable health insurance

One of Sacramento’s great laments is the number of Californians without health insurance. The predictable bad solution has been to propose billions in additional taxes. California has been spared so far from this counterintuitive, costly “solution.” Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and legislators ought to look eastward for a better idea. But …

Commentary

Innovation Incentives in Danger from Congress

U.S. patents have fostered American innovation ever since George Washington signed the first one in 1790. By protecting the rights of inventors, the patent system has spurred the development of everything from the light bulb to lifesaving medicines. You wouldn’t think Congress would want to mess with such a winning …

Commentary

Piping a Different Tune

This journal continues its tradition of publishing hostile reviews about Harvard University professor Regina Herzlinger’s books with the one by Alan Maynard (Nov/Dec 07). After introducing her book, Who Killed Health Care: America’s $2 Trillion Medical Problem—and the Consumer-Driven Cure, by gratuitously attempting to stir controversy with another Harvard academic, …

Business & Economics

A Tribute to William F. Buckley, Jr.

The cause of freedom suffered an irreplaceable loss when National Review founder and intellectual decathlete William F. Buckley passed away at 82 on February 27. Mr. Buckley’s prodigious accomplishments are well known to PRI supporters, and in December, 2000, he teamed with Milton Friedman as keynote speaker for PRI’s gala …

Commentary

Do Our Candidates Need Their Vision Corrected?

The campaign trail is awash with promises to make universal health care a reality in the next presidential term. Candidates from both parties claim they can lower costs — and insure everyone — through legislative mandates and increased government intervention in the healthcare market. But they’re wrong. Only with a …

Commentary

On Patent Reform, Don’t Be Evil

Google has achieved wild success and cultural notoriety by operating under the corporate mantra “Don’t be evil.” But when it comes to patent reforms currently under consideration in Congress, Google — along with several other tech heavyweights — seems to be straying from the company line. The Patent Reform Act, …

Commentary

Losing by ‘Saving’

To help close New York’s $4.4 billion budget deficit, Gov. Spitzer has put prescription drugs on the chopping block. His budget proposal for the next fiscal year would axe drug spending by $172 million from the $1.9 billion otherwise expected. The governor describes this as a way “to control the …

Business & Economics

Defying Depression Stereotypes

Readers will recall that, in September, the Contrarian reviewed The Forgotten Man, by Amity Shlaes, a history of the Depression that charts the massive growth in government dating from the New Deal. For that reason alone we considered Amity’s book a valuable work, and quite suitable for “women’s studies,” as …

Business & Economics

Male-Female Facts and Fallacies

“History shows that the career paths of women over the course of the twentieth century bore little resemblance to a scenario in which variations in employer discrimination explain variations in women’s career progress.” The author of that statement, Thomas Sowell, Hoover Institution scholar, believes that there is indeed discrimination against …

Commentary

Thailand’s misuse of ‘compulsory licensing’ allowed corrupt officials to steal millions

When it comes to public health, Thailand’s former government leaders would like the world to think that they’re a collection of 21st-century Robin Hoods. Last year, the unelected military-backed government gave Thailand’s state-run pharmaceutical firm, the Government Pharmaceutical Organization (GPO), permission to manufacture generic versions of drugs that fight heart …

California

State should look east for affordable health insurance

One of Sacramento’s great laments is the number of Californians without health insurance. The predictable bad solution has been to propose billions in additional taxes. California has been spared so far from this counterintuitive, costly “solution.” Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and legislators ought to look eastward for a better idea. But …

Commentary

Innovation Incentives in Danger from Congress

U.S. patents have fostered American innovation ever since George Washington signed the first one in 1790. By protecting the rights of inventors, the patent system has spurred the development of everything from the light bulb to lifesaving medicines. You wouldn’t think Congress would want to mess with such a winning …

Commentary

Piping a Different Tune

This journal continues its tradition of publishing hostile reviews about Harvard University professor Regina Herzlinger’s books with the one by Alan Maynard (Nov/Dec 07). After introducing her book, Who Killed Health Care: America’s $2 Trillion Medical Problem—and the Consumer-Driven Cure, by gratuitously attempting to stir controversy with another Harvard academic, …

Business & Economics

A Tribute to William F. Buckley, Jr.

The cause of freedom suffered an irreplaceable loss when National Review founder and intellectual decathlete William F. Buckley passed away at 82 on February 27. Mr. Buckley’s prodigious accomplishments are well known to PRI supporters, and in December, 2000, he teamed with Milton Friedman as keynote speaker for PRI’s gala …

Commentary

Do Our Candidates Need Their Vision Corrected?

The campaign trail is awash with promises to make universal health care a reality in the next presidential term. Candidates from both parties claim they can lower costs — and insure everyone — through legislative mandates and increased government intervention in the healthcare market. But they’re wrong. Only with a …

Commentary

On Patent Reform, Don’t Be Evil

Google has achieved wild success and cultural notoriety by operating under the corporate mantra “Don’t be evil.” But when it comes to patent reforms currently under consideration in Congress, Google — along with several other tech heavyweights — seems to be straying from the company line. The Patent Reform Act, …

Commentary

Losing by ‘Saving’

To help close New York’s $4.4 billion budget deficit, Gov. Spitzer has put prescription drugs on the chopping block. His budget proposal for the next fiscal year would axe drug spending by $172 million from the $1.9 billion otherwise expected. The governor describes this as a way “to control the …

Business & Economics

Defying Depression Stereotypes

Readers will recall that, in September, the Contrarian reviewed The Forgotten Man, by Amity Shlaes, a history of the Depression that charts the massive growth in government dating from the New Deal. For that reason alone we considered Amity’s book a valuable work, and quite suitable for “women’s studies,” as …

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