McKenzie Richards

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Prop 29 Isn’t Kidney-ing Around

During the pandemic, suddenly everyone became armchair medical experts – much to the chagrin of actual epidemiologists. We soon learned the dangers of politicizing health issues.   But on this year’s ballot, California voters will have to become armchair medical experts when they vote on Proposition 29, who will be …

Blog

In Political Speech, “Universal” Means Anything But

Every few months, the argument to “universalize” some sector of the economy captures national attention – be it for universal health care, universal childcare, or universal student loan forgiveness. All the arguments have an all-too-often overlooked fatal flaw: they assume goods are not scarce. In economic terms, all goods have …

Blog

Secure Telehealth Laws to Aid Nurses with Kids

Juggling work life and home life can be daunting for working mothers. For parents working in the healthcare sector, those pressures are often exacerbated by the doctor shortage, length of shifts, and the sheer number of patients. Fortunately, loosening scope-of-practice laws for nurses and expanding telehealth options potentially offers some …

Blog

No More Surprise Medical Bills

Imagine going to your local furniture store to pick out a new couch. An eager employee approaches you and helps you find the perfect piece for your new home. You make the purchase, thank the employee, and go on your merry way. Weeks later, you open the mail. Congratulations! You …

Blog

Telehealth: A Great “Parenting Tool”

Telehealth experiments during the pandemic confirmed the immense positive impact that virtual options provide to communities. It helps individuals in rural areas, those struggling with mental health crises, the poor, and even individuals with rare disorders. Speaking more generally, equipping young families with telehealth options also greatly helps parents. I …

Blog

The Administrative State: Who is Really in Charge?

One somewhat overlooked but recent Supreme Court case contains potentially powerful implications for the private sector’s operational culture, especially in health care and education West Virginia v. EPA centered around the question of whether the Environmental Protection Agency has the authority to regulate how electricity is generated. Motivated to reduce …

Blog

An Answer to Our Broken Health Insurance

Even though an increasing share of Americans have health insurance, positive health outcomes and access to health services are actually decreasing, as found in a 2021 study by PRI senior fellow Wayne Winegarden. Why? The insurance model in the United States is deeply broken for many reasons. But it is …

Blog

Housing is Not Health Care and Medicaid Must Not Pay Rent

The New York Times recently published an article titled, “If Housing is a Health Care Issue, Should Medicaid Pay the Rent?” Throughout the piece, the author tells various stories of how using Medicaid to pay for housing in Philadelphia and Arizona has helped some homeless individuals. She explained current federal …

Blog

Dysfunctional Department Store Demonstrate Health Care Hoodwinks

Recently, a storewide sale sign lured me into a local department store. I meandered the aisles until I found a birthday gift for my toddler: a cute magnetic fishing pole toy. But to my surprise, I couldn’t find the item’s price anywhere. Not on the box, not on the shelf. …

Blog

New Regulation Will Take Health Care Money From Those in Need

A new proposal tucked away in Governor Newsom’s 2022-23 budget plans to divert health care funds to pay for new projects such as housing, transportation, and food security in low-income communities. It’s true that the cost of living in California has ballooned to unsustainable levels and innovative solutions are needed. …

Blog

Prop 29 Isn’t Kidney-ing Around

During the pandemic, suddenly everyone became armchair medical experts – much to the chagrin of actual epidemiologists. We soon learned the dangers of politicizing health issues.   But on this year’s ballot, California voters will have to become armchair medical experts when they vote on Proposition 29, who will be …

Blog

In Political Speech, “Universal” Means Anything But

Every few months, the argument to “universalize” some sector of the economy captures national attention – be it for universal health care, universal childcare, or universal student loan forgiveness. All the arguments have an all-too-often overlooked fatal flaw: they assume goods are not scarce. In economic terms, all goods have …

Blog

Secure Telehealth Laws to Aid Nurses with Kids

Juggling work life and home life can be daunting for working mothers. For parents working in the healthcare sector, those pressures are often exacerbated by the doctor shortage, length of shifts, and the sheer number of patients. Fortunately, loosening scope-of-practice laws for nurses and expanding telehealth options potentially offers some …

Blog

No More Surprise Medical Bills

Imagine going to your local furniture store to pick out a new couch. An eager employee approaches you and helps you find the perfect piece for your new home. You make the purchase, thank the employee, and go on your merry way. Weeks later, you open the mail. Congratulations! You …

Blog

Telehealth: A Great “Parenting Tool”

Telehealth experiments during the pandemic confirmed the immense positive impact that virtual options provide to communities. It helps individuals in rural areas, those struggling with mental health crises, the poor, and even individuals with rare disorders. Speaking more generally, equipping young families with telehealth options also greatly helps parents. I …

Blog

The Administrative State: Who is Really in Charge?

One somewhat overlooked but recent Supreme Court case contains potentially powerful implications for the private sector’s operational culture, especially in health care and education West Virginia v. EPA centered around the question of whether the Environmental Protection Agency has the authority to regulate how electricity is generated. Motivated to reduce …

Blog

An Answer to Our Broken Health Insurance

Even though an increasing share of Americans have health insurance, positive health outcomes and access to health services are actually decreasing, as found in a 2021 study by PRI senior fellow Wayne Winegarden. Why? The insurance model in the United States is deeply broken for many reasons. But it is …

Blog

Housing is Not Health Care and Medicaid Must Not Pay Rent

The New York Times recently published an article titled, “If Housing is a Health Care Issue, Should Medicaid Pay the Rent?” Throughout the piece, the author tells various stories of how using Medicaid to pay for housing in Philadelphia and Arizona has helped some homeless individuals. She explained current federal …

Blog

Dysfunctional Department Store Demonstrate Health Care Hoodwinks

Recently, a storewide sale sign lured me into a local department store. I meandered the aisles until I found a birthday gift for my toddler: a cute magnetic fishing pole toy. But to my surprise, I couldn’t find the item’s price anywhere. Not on the box, not on the shelf. …

Blog

New Regulation Will Take Health Care Money From Those in Need

A new proposal tucked away in Governor Newsom’s 2022-23 budget plans to divert health care funds to pay for new projects such as housing, transportation, and food security in low-income communities. It’s true that the cost of living in California has ballooned to unsustainable levels and innovative solutions are needed. …

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